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Photo by Susan Yin on Unsplash

Mobility as a Service (MaaS) has experienced a deeper level of scrutiny and re-assessment over the past few months. There have been many articles, op eds, webinars, and podcasts devoted to the topic of commercial and business model sustainability for MaaS platforms, public and private. In addition, the use cases that demonstrate long term viability of MaaS have also been deconstructed to better understand how they can best serve consumers and society at large.

Through this deeper level of introspection, many different (and consistent) themes have been discussed and circulated amongst the mobility ecosystem for a better understanding of the…


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Photo by Mika Baumeister on Unsplash

Introduction

Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) has been receiving quite a bit of attention lately. Stakeholders, investors, operators, and the general public have become quite familar with the concept of MaaS. However, many are wondering what this all means for the future of mobility and how we function as a society of individuals left with personal choices related to how we move about the urban environment.

This attention is specifically related to what is the value MaaS can deliver to society in terms of contribution to the betterment of environment, economy, and public health. While COVID-19 has served as an inflection point in…


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Virgin Hyperloop One Concept

The past six months has left our heads spinning. From complete lockdown and isolation, to phased reopenings, to a summer that encouraged (and promoted) holiday travel to desinations throughout Europe, the mobility landscape we have learned to navigate in and around has been ever changing. Fellow urbanists (such as myself) have sought to use this opportunity during the “pause” in movement and economic activity to promote urban design and intervention schemes that were only visions and dreams just a year ago. …


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A new mobility forum has recently launched in the Greater Copenhagen Bi-National Region of Eastern Denmark and Southern Sweden to establish a broad discussion around sustainable mobility and accessability, rural mobility, and other topics. The forum is aiming for a broad group of stakeholders across 4 regions, 70+ municipalities, 3+ PTAs and a number of private service and tech providers to have a continuous discussion and debate on the future of sustainable mobility.

Greater Copenhagen Region

Four regions and 46 local authorities in Eastern Denmark, as well as 33 local authorities and a region in Southern Sweden collaborate closely to…


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Photo by Andrew Gook on Unsplash

As our cities emerge from lockdown stage post-COVID, physical urban design interventions have been implemented on a broad scale. From wider sidewalks, to pop up bike lanes, to car free central business districts, many of the ideas and schemes that were only dreamt of by urbanists post-World War II to counteract the primacy of the automobile have been quickly put into action.

Flattening the Curve

While this has been a promising infrastructure opportunity, the motivations for this transformation are rooted in the requirements for encouraging social distancing to “flatten the curve” from a public health perspective. A key concern amongst…


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Photo by Pontus Ohlsson on Unsplash

The Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) in Skåne project (Sweden) proposed by Innovation Skane, Skanetrafiken, and Iomob has been recently selected as a grant award recipient by the Swedish Energy Agency (SEA) to deliver a regional, open multimodal shared mobility platform for municipalities including Malmo, Lund, and Helsingborg, starting later this year. In 2019, Iomob was one of three winners of the 2019 Swedish Sustainable Mobility Challenge (SMC), which led to this opportunity with the Skåne region.

Iomob has developed a technology platform for mobility that enables seamless, multimodal travel over an open network with a large number of mobility service providers (MSPs)…


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Photo by Jed Dela Cruz on Unsplash

These are certainly interesting times we live in. While the world is in the process of being completely transformed (in some ways for the better) due to the COVID-19 crisis, there has been an unequal response seen in the mobility ecosystem. In many ways the crisis has laid to bare the ongoing trends that have been brewing for some time.

Trends Between Europe and the United States

These trends are related to the complete disruption that has occurred in the mobility sector over the past few years, such as 1.) disinvestment in public transport, 2.) over-reliance on VC funding for…


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Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

Mobility has been impacted the world over due to the COVID 19 crisis. From public transport, to micromobility, to individual auto commuting, all modes have seen a dramatic decrease in usage across the urban ecosystem. What is yet to be seen is how cities and their inhabitants will move in the coming days, weeks, months and years. We are starting to get a preview of what is to come, based upon innovative, sustainable, and human centric initiatives being introduced at the local and urban level.

Many cities are rapidly introducing interventions to make their streets networks less car centric, and…


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Photo by Fusion Medical Animation on Unsplash

Mobility. It is the glue that binds cities, societies, and civilizations together. What was just two months ago a necessity in conducting our daily routines has been (at least temporarily) disrupted to such an extent, that 80–90% of intercity passenger demand for travel is expected to be eliminated entirely in 2020 alone.

However, given the extent and widespread external affects of the COVID 19 crisis on urban and global goods movement and urban mobility, we are starting to see opportunities to address the 1.) near term public health challenges and 2.) ensure a more environmentally sustainable future. In specific settings…


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Photo by Mika Baumeister on Unsplash

As 2019 drew to a close, the dust began to settle on the “gold rush” that was shared mobility over the past few years. Reality began to set in, and the collective hangover we’ve all been experiencing made us start to question where we are, and where we’re going.

Boyd Cohen, PhD, CEO of Iomob recently took the long view of mobility in his article, “3 Mobility Paradigms 2020–2030”. His was a forecast of the decade to come, where he focuses on the following three stages: Mobility 1.0 -Tech driven, car-centric, Mobility 2.0 -Technology-enabled, city-led, and Mobility 3.0 …

Scott Shepard

Urban planner, designer, geographer, mobility expert, advisor, strategist, and thought leader

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